San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art's Sandbox Projects

San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art's Sandbox Projects

December 30, 2019 by Jeanne Cooper

The San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art may be turning 40 next year, but the playful, inquisitive spirit of its Sandbox Projects epitomizes Silicon Valley’s youthful energy. “A Sandbox Project is something that is immersive or site-specific that is unique—it won’t be created that exact way again,” explains Christine Koppes, the museum’s curator and director of public programs. In the current Sandbox Project, titled Clive McCarthy: Electric Paintings (through March 22), the San Francisco artist’s digitized paintings “move and change constantly,” Koppes notes. Another exhibition, Stas Orlovski: Chimera (also through March 22), also showcases movement and technology—“a kind of a natural fit for a gallery in the heart of Silicon Valley,” Koppes notes. A third concurrent show, Sense of Self (through March 15), uses portraits by Bay Area photographers to explore “really personal identity issues,” including race, immigration and sexuality, Koppes says. “The artists are trying to create the future they want to see.”













San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art's Sandbox Projects

December 30, 2019 by Jeanne Cooper

The San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art may be turning 40 next year, but the playful, inquisitive spirit of its Sandbox Projects epitomizes Silicon Valley’s youthful energy. “A Sandbox Project is something that is immersive or site-specific that is unique—it won’t be created that exact way again,” explains Christine Koppes, the museum’s curator and director of public programs. In the current Sandbox Project, titled Clive McCarthy: Electric Paintings (through March 22), the San Francisco artist’s digitized paintings “move and change constantly,” Koppes notes. Another exhibition, Stas Orlovski: Chimera (also through March 22), also showcases movement and technology—“a kind of a natural fit for a gallery in the heart of Silicon Valley,” Koppes notes. A third concurrent show, Sense of Self (through March 15), uses portraits by Bay Area photographers to explore “really personal identity issues,” including race, immigration and sexuality, Koppes says. “The artists are trying to create the future they want to see.”