Going Greek with Nick Roth

Going Greek with Nick Roth

December 30, 2019 by Casey Gillespie

“The idea of using the three Fates came to me gradually as I tried to work through how to present, in visual form, my fairly pessimistic sense that time takes us along in ways we have little control over and ends us when it wants to,” says artist, 3D animator and graphic designer Nick Roth. The concept of the Greek Fates—Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos— in artists’ work isn’t new, but Roth gives them new life in his three-panel, 10-minute-long, unfolding animation, Nick Roth: Fates, currently on exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Art. Through his exploration of the goddesses, Roth addresses the cacophony of seemingly random events that make up our lives and ultimately result in our demise. “I had something more abstract in mind, something that required the viewer to try and recognize the three figures even when they are fairly lost in a sea of moving objects. I wanted the viewer to have to struggle a bit to recognize fate when it appears,” says the artist. While it might sound foreboding, the artist finds a way to transform the heady material into something truly beautiful. Through March 1, Balboa Park, sdmart.org













Going Greek with Nick Roth

December 30, 2019 by Casey Gillespie

“The idea of using the three Fates came to me gradually as I tried to work through how to present, in visual form, my fairly pessimistic sense that time takes us along in ways we have little control over and ends us when it wants to,” says artist, 3D animator and graphic designer Nick Roth. The concept of the Greek Fates—Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos— in artists’ work isn’t new, but Roth gives them new life in his three-panel, 10-minute-long, unfolding animation, Nick Roth: Fates, currently on exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Art. Through his exploration of the goddesses, Roth addresses the cacophony of seemingly random events that make up our lives and ultimately result in our demise. “I had something more abstract in mind, something that required the viewer to try and recognize the three figures even when they are fairly lost in a sea of moving objects. I wanted the viewer to have to struggle a bit to recognize fate when it appears,” says the artist. While it might sound foreboding, the artist finds a way to transform the heady material into something truly beautiful. Through March 1, Balboa Park, sdmart.org





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