New Life in Death Valley

New Life in Death Valley

January 10, 2020 by Emmy Kasten

Within North America’s lowest, hottest, largest and driest national park lies a luxurious retreat that is worth braving the elements. After a multimillion-dollar face-lift, The Oasis at Death Valley is a Four Diamond escape to add to your bucket list.

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Death Valley has long provided a respite from SoCal life, welcoming both Hollywood stars and adventurers looking for a peaceful change in scenery. Within the 3.3 million-acre national park–which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year–lies the historic Inn at Death Valley. Originally built in 1927 as the Furnace Creek Inn, it was once an exclusive escape for Hollywood legends including Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, James Cagney, Bette Davis and John Wayne. Now, after a recently completed $100 million renovation, the newly minted The Oasis at Death Valley has restored its original charm to attract a new crop of well-heeled visitors.

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“The idea was to create a destination resort that happens to be within a national park,” says general manager Trey Matheu. “We’re seeing a new level of visitor that is open to the national park experience that isn’t interested in roughing it.” With a beautifully restored spring-fed swimming pool surrounded by cabanas, 22 newly built spacious casitas equipped with the use of a golf cart, the addition of a Wellness Sanctuary for spa treatments, and a challenging 18-hole golf course, The Oasis has been resurrected as a luxury haven. Dining options are plenty and range from The Last Kind Words Saloon with its Old West-themed decor to the more subtle Inn Dining Room, where sophisticated menu items include prime wagyu ribeye, organic Jidori chicken and a selection of vegetarian choices. But despite all the frills at The Oasis, the area’s highlight remains the landscape where you can hike, bike, ride horseback and more. “There’s so much land that you can wander and explore,” says Matheu. “I love the solitude.” Casitas from $500 per night, oasisatdeathvalley.com

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New Life in Death Valley

January 10, 2020 by Emmy Kasten

Within North America’s lowest, hottest, largest and driest national park lies a luxurious retreat that is worth braving the elements. After a multimillion-dollar face-lift, The Oasis at Death Valley is a Four Diamond escape to add to your bucket list.

Oasis-Inn_NightPool_Sunset_030.jpg

Death Valley has long provided a respite from SoCal life, welcoming both Hollywood stars and adventurers looking for a peaceful change in scenery. Within the 3.3 million-acre national park–which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year–lies the historic Inn at Death Valley. Originally built in 1927 as the Furnace Creek Inn, it was once an exclusive escape for Hollywood legends including Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, James Cagney, Bette Davis and John Wayne. Now, after a recently completed $100 million renovation, the newly minted The Oasis at Death Valley has restored its original charm to attract a new crop of well-heeled visitors.

Oasis-Inn_SpaTreatmentRoom_009.jpg

“The idea was to create a destination resort that happens to be within a national park,” says general manager Trey Matheu. “We’re seeing a new level of visitor that is open to the national park experience that isn’t interested in roughing it.” With a beautifully restored spring-fed swimming pool surrounded by cabanas, 22 newly built spacious casitas equipped with the use of a golf cart, the addition of a Wellness Sanctuary for spa treatments, and a challenging 18-hole golf course, The Oasis has been resurrected as a luxury haven. Dining options are plenty and range from The Last Kind Words Saloon with its Old West-themed decor to the more subtle Inn Dining Room, where sophisticated menu items include prime wagyu ribeye, organic Jidori chicken and a selection of vegetarian choices. But despite all the frills at The Oasis, the area’s highlight remains the landscape where you can hike, bike, ride horseback and more. “There’s so much land that you can wander and explore,” says Matheu. “I love the solitude.” Casitas from $500 per night, oasisatdeathvalley.com

Oasis_FurnaceCreekGolfCourse_Hole7.jpg