Navigating the Jungle of Private Jet Programs

Navigating the Jungle of Private Jet Programs

February 21, 2020 by Doug Gollan

You probably don’t need much convincing that flying privately will make your life better. For business trips that require stops in three or four places, a private jet can shrink a Monday to Friday trip to a single day. Since you control your schedule, you can make sure you get back for date night, an important party or your men’s lacrosse league. Driven by convenience, jet cards are the hottest growth segment of private aviation. The number of providers has doubled in the past decade. Jet card memberships often give you fixed rates, so you know how much you will pay in advance. Guaranteed availability means as long as you call, text or tap your app, you will get a plane to go where you want, when you want. Many programs require 24 hours notice or less.

The biggest challenge is finding the right solution among all the options. Oenophiles have Parker’s Wine Buyer’s Guide. Car buyers have the Kelley Blue Book. If you are in the market for a private aviation membership program, Private Jet Card Comparisons compares over 250 jet card offerings across more than 65 variables. In addition to highlighting the myriad of choices, it reveals the various differences that will guide first-time and veteran buyers to the programs that best meet their needs. One of the biggest mistakes jet card buyers make is to buy without doing a thorough assessment of their own needs.

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For example, where do you plan to fly? Programs have what is referred to as a PSA, short for Primary Service Area. Some are global, many are national, and others are regional. Some include the Caribbean and Mexico, while others don’t.

Another place buyers get tripped up is daily minimums. Daily minimums not only vary by provider, but by aircraft type. If you fly from Scottsdale to Las Vegas, a 56-minute hop, and you get a bill for two hours, that’s because your program had a 120-minute minimum. This is also critical when comparing hourly rates, since a $6,500 per hour rate with a 60-minute minimum is going to be cheaper for a one-hour flight than, say, a $5,000 per hour rate with a 90-minute minimum. The latter will cost $7,500.

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Other issues that vary among the jet card companies are: Being able to upgrade or downgrade the size of the jet; any cost for upgrades/downgrades; is Federal Excise Tax included in the quote; is in-flight connectivity guaranteed? There are many factors to consider.

You’ll also want to ask about refund policies and escrow accounts. Many programs require six-figure deposits, so you will want to know if you can get your money back in case you are not happy, and should the company fail, that your funds are protected. $250 annual membership, privatejetcardcomparisons.com













Navigating the Jungle of Private Jet Programs

February 21, 2020 by Doug Gollan

You probably don’t need much convincing that flying privately will make your life better. For business trips that require stops in three or four places, a private jet can shrink a Monday to Friday trip to a single day. Since you control your schedule, you can make sure you get back for date night, an important party or your men’s lacrosse league. Driven by convenience, jet cards are the hottest growth segment of private aviation. The number of providers has doubled in the past decade. Jet card memberships often give you fixed rates, so you know how much you will pay in advance. Guaranteed availability means as long as you call, text or tap your app, you will get a plane to go where you want, when you want. Many programs require 24 hours notice or less.

The biggest challenge is finding the right solution among all the options. Oenophiles have Parker’s Wine Buyer’s Guide. Car buyers have the Kelley Blue Book. If you are in the market for a private aviation membership program, Private Jet Card Comparisons compares over 250 jet card offerings across more than 65 variables. In addition to highlighting the myriad of choices, it reveals the various differences that will guide first-time and veteran buyers to the programs that best meet their needs. One of the biggest mistakes jet card buyers make is to buy without doing a thorough assessment of their own needs.

image2.jpeg

For example, where do you plan to fly? Programs have what is referred to as a PSA, short for Primary Service Area. Some are global, many are national, and others are regional. Some include the Caribbean and Mexico, while others don’t.

Another place buyers get tripped up is daily minimums. Daily minimums not only vary by provider, but by aircraft type. If you fly from Scottsdale to Las Vegas, a 56-minute hop, and you get a bill for two hours, that’s because your program had a 120-minute minimum. This is also critical when comparing hourly rates, since a $6,500 per hour rate with a 60-minute minimum is going to be cheaper for a one-hour flight than, say, a $5,000 per hour rate with a 90-minute minimum. The latter will cost $7,500.

image3.jpeg

Other issues that vary among the jet card companies are: Being able to upgrade or downgrade the size of the jet; any cost for upgrades/downgrades; is Federal Excise Tax included in the quote; is in-flight connectivity guaranteed? There are many factors to consider.

You’ll also want to ask about refund policies and escrow accounts. Many programs require six-figure deposits, so you will want to know if you can get your money back in case you are not happy, and should the company fail, that your funds are protected. $250 annual membership, privatejetcardcomparisons.com