Mexican Food with a French Refinement

Mexican Food with a French Refinement

November 10, 2019 by –Ariel Cheung

Chef Carlos Gaytán has a different objective entirely from when he debuted the now-shuttered Mexique a decade ago. Then, he was tasked with getting diners comfortable with the notion of his native Mexican food prepared with French refinement. In contrast, “You are finding lots of Michelin-starred chefs using Mexican ingredients these days,” he says. “Chefs vacation in Mexico City and come back and put mole on their menu.” Refined Mexican is now the norm, which means Gaytán’s three-in-one concept on State Street needed to push boundaries in new ways. Tzuco, the more casual of the two full-service restaurants (Tales of Carlos Gaytán being the second and Panango, a Mexican bakery, completing the trio) and named for his hometown, Huitzuco, does so in inventive ways, topping mussels with dried chorizo and a saffron-infused beurre blanc, rubbing red snapper with ground guajillo chiles and infusing traditional dishes like chile relleno with atypical components like wild mushrooms and tomato fondue. “It’s not just about tacos anymore,” Gaytán jokes. Meanwhile, the food will take on an even more personal vibe with an eight- to 12-course tasting menu at Tales of Carlos Gaytán, set to open this winter. “It’s going to be my soul in a dish,” Gaytán says. “We’ll tell you a story with each course.” 720 N. State St., 312.274.8995, tzuco.com













Mexican Food with a French Refinement

November 10, 2019 by –Ariel Cheung

Chef Carlos Gaytán has a different objective entirely from when he debuted the now-shuttered Mexique a decade ago. Then, he was tasked with getting diners comfortable with the notion of his native Mexican food prepared with French refinement. In contrast, “You are finding lots of Michelin-starred chefs using Mexican ingredients these days,” he says. “Chefs vacation in Mexico City and come back and put mole on their menu.” Refined Mexican is now the norm, which means Gaytán’s three-in-one concept on State Street needed to push boundaries in new ways. Tzuco, the more casual of the two full-service restaurants (Tales of Carlos Gaytán being the second and Panango, a Mexican bakery, completing the trio) and named for his hometown, Huitzuco, does so in inventive ways, topping mussels with dried chorizo and a saffron-infused beurre blanc, rubbing red snapper with ground guajillo chiles and infusing traditional dishes like chile relleno with atypical components like wild mushrooms and tomato fondue. “It’s not just about tacos anymore,” Gaytán jokes. Meanwhile, the food will take on an even more personal vibe with an eight- to 12-course tasting menu at Tales of Carlos Gaytán, set to open this winter. “It’s going to be my soul in a dish,” Gaytán says. “We’ll tell you a story with each course.” 720 N. State St., 312.274.8995, tzuco.com