First Four-Door “Mustang” Goes All Electric

First Four-Door “Mustang” Goes All Electric

November 18, 2019 by Nate Chapnick

For the first time in 55 years, Ford’s iconic Mustang is becoming a four-door, expanding the Mustang lineup to more than just a two-door coupe and convertible. Their new four-door crossover is all-electric and aimed squarely at Tesla’s upcoming Model Y. With the Extended Range battery option and rear-wheel drive, Ford’s new $50,600 Mustang Mach-E Premium aims to deliver an EPA-estimated range of at least 300 miles on a single charge. Range on the performance-oriented $60,500 Mach E GT is lower, at roughly 235 miles, though it will sprint from zero to 60 mph in around 3.5 seconds and is all-wheel drive. However, the GT model will not be available when the Mach E launches in late 2020, this model will come in early 2021 instead. The First Edition Mustang will launch with a sticker of $59,900 and will have an estimated range of 270 miles with all-wheel drive and will launch from zero to 60 mph in around 5.5 seconds. One competitive advantage the Mustang Mach E has over the Tesla Model Y is that Fords still qualify for the full $7,500 electric vehicle federal tax credit.

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Inside, the Mach E’s design was clearly heavily inspired by Tesla’s Model S, with its large 15.5-inch center touch screen and the elimination of nearly all buttons. As with all Teslas, Ford claims that the new Mach E can be continuously improved over time through over the air updates. While not quite as large as the Model Y, the Mustang will offer a 4.8 cubic feet frunk (front trunk) that is water resistant and drainable, allowing it to serve as a portable cooler for trips to the beach or tailgating parties.

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Whether you opt for the 75.7 kWh battery standard range or the 98.8 kWh battery extended-range model, both models can be charged free for two years using FordPass’ charging network and the VW-backed Electrify America DC Fast chargers, which can take a battery from 10 percent power to 80 percent within 45 minutes. No matter how you slice it, Ford’s first serious entry into the electric world looks impressive so far, but stay tuned for a full drive review from Mensbook once we get behind the wheel to see if all of this technology works as well as Ford hopes.

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First Four-Door “Mustang” Goes All Electric

November 18, 2019 by Nate Chapnick

For the first time in 55 years, Ford’s iconic Mustang is becoming a four-door, expanding the Mustang lineup to more than just a two-door coupe and convertible. Their new four-door crossover is all-electric and aimed squarely at Tesla’s upcoming Model Y. With the Extended Range battery option and rear-wheel drive, Ford’s new $50,600 Mustang Mach-E Premium aims to deliver an EPA-estimated range of at least 300 miles on a single charge. Range on the performance-oriented $60,500 Mach E GT is lower, at roughly 235 miles, though it will sprint from zero to 60 mph in around 3.5 seconds and is all-wheel drive. However, the GT model will not be available when the Mach E launches in late 2020, this model will come in early 2021 instead. The First Edition Mustang will launch with a sticker of $59,900 and will have an estimated range of 270 miles with all-wheel drive and will launch from zero to 60 mph in around 5.5 seconds. One competitive advantage the Mustang Mach E has over the Tesla Model Y is that Fords still qualify for the full $7,500 electric vehicle federal tax credit.

21_FRD_MCH_48131.jpg

Inside, the Mach E’s design was clearly heavily inspired by Tesla’s Model S, with its large 15.5-inch center touch screen and the elimination of nearly all buttons. As with all Teslas, Ford claims that the new Mach E can be continuously improved over time through over the air updates. While not quite as large as the Model Y, the Mustang will offer a 4.8 cubic feet frunk (front trunk) that is water resistant and drainable, allowing it to serve as a portable cooler for trips to the beach or tailgating parties.

21_FRD_MCH_48128.jpg

Whether you opt for the 75.7 kWh battery standard range or the 98.8 kWh battery extended-range model, both models can be charged free for two years using FordPass’ charging network and the VW-backed Electrify America DC Fast chargers, which can take a battery from 10 percent power to 80 percent within 45 minutes. No matter how you slice it, Ford’s first serious entry into the electric world looks impressive so far, but stay tuned for a full drive review from Mensbook once we get behind the wheel to see if all of this technology works as well as Ford hopes.

21_FRD_MCH_48135.jpg





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