8 Fall Recipes From Leading Chefs Across The Country

8 Fall Recipes From Leading Chefs Across The Country

September 22, 2023 by

By: Kat Bein By: Kat Bein

Is autumn the best season for food?

Besides the mania that surrounds all things pumpkin spice, fall also gives us soup season, hearty meat dishes, all manner of squash and root vegetables and delicious desserts.

Basically, the cooler months are the ultimate excuse for heaps of comfort food, and we want to help you get cozy with a few of our favorite fall recipes from the nation’s leading chefs and beloved restaurants.

See also: 4 Festive Fall Recipes from Celebrity Caterer Andrea Correale

From soups and sides to main courses, delectable drinks and desserts worth saving room for, these fall recipes below are sure to make the whole family go for seconds, or make your next friendly gathering a hit to remember!

Butternut Squash and Apple Bisque

butternut squash and apple bisque

Christian Ojeda is the executive chef at Bernardus Lodge & Spa in California, and his guests can’t get enough of this warm bowl of goodness.

“This is an ideal dish for any seasonal event,” Ojeda says. “The butternut squash is a perfect foil for the Gala apples, which add a nice bite. It can be a meal in itself served with a nice crusty bread or starter for any holiday occasion.” Learn more at the full link.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp blended olive oil
  • 1½ cups leeks, chopped (white parts only)
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 3 cups butternut squash, cut into cubes
  • 2 each Gala apples; peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1 quart vegetable stock
  • ¼ cup white wine
  • ¼ cup apple cider
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • Chopped chives
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. In a large pot over medium heat. Add olive oil, leeks and onions, and cook until the onion softens and turns translucent, about 4 to 5 minutes.
  2. Deglaze with white wine, then add squash, apple, apple cider and vegetable stock.
  3. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, then simmer until the vegetables are soft, about 20 minutes.
  4. Carefully puree the soup in batches in a blender.
  5. Once the soup has been pureed, return it to the pot and stir in the cream. Season with nutmeg, salt, and pepper, then simmer gently for 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish with chopped chives, and enjoy!

Roasted Sweet Potato

roasted sweet potato

Sweet potato is one of fall’s absolute calling cards, and New York City’s Mediterranean restaurant Zou’s Zou’s makes the most of this root vegetable with miso goat butter, dukkha and date molasses.

“I like to think of the ember-roasted sweet potato as the sleeper hit of our menu,” says executive chef Madeline Sperling. "A sweet potato is humble on its own, but when charred in our hearth embers and dressed up with umami miso goat butter, sweet date molasses and a crunchy hazelnut dukkah, it becomes a showstopper of a vegetable dish.” Read more about this recipe at the full link.

Ingredients:

  • Sweet Potato
  • Miso Goat Butter

Dukkha

  • 45 grams of toasted hazelnuts chopped, dust shaken through perforated pan
  • 6 grams of toasted coriander, cracked with mortar and pestle
  • 7 grams of toasted white sesame seeds
  • 7 grams of toasted black sesame seeds
  • 7 grams of toasted cumin seeds
  • 4 grams of toasted fennel seeds
  • 1 gram of salt
  • Extra virgin olive oil

Date Molasses

  • 250 grams of date molasses
  • 30 grams of lime juice
  • 3 grams of salt

Directions:

Make the Dukkha

  1. Mix the spices and the hazelnuts together.
  2. Add salt and a drop of evoo to help the seasoning stick to the mixture.
  3. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.

Make the Date Molasses

  1. Whisk all the ingredients together.
  2. Store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Roast the sweet potato

  1. Prepare grill to 375 degrees F, then grill the potatoes on indirect heat for up to an hour, flipping once half-way.
  2. Before removing the potatoes from the grill, set them over direct heat to give the skin some char.
  3. Peel back the chard skin of the sweet potato and gently mash up the inside of the potato, then create a spoon-sized divot in the middle.
  4. In that divot, place a dollop of miso goat butter and generously garnish the potato with the dukkha.
  5. Drizzle the date molasses over top, and enjoy!

Red Wine Braised Short Rib

red wine braised short rib

Looking to impress with a main course that will stick to your ribs and burst with flavor? This recipe from chef Christian Alejandro of Oaken Bistro and Bar near Chicago is the stuff of cozy-night fantasy.

“This recipe was inspired by one from Auguste Escoffier, a 19th-century chef, restaurateur and culinary writer from France most famous for popularizing updated traditional French cooking methods,” chef Alejandro says. “The fundamental techniques employed in this recipe incorporate his teachings and culinary style to offer the diner a mouthwatering, indulgent experience with each and every bite.” Read more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Marinade

  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 2 carrot grams carrots, cut into a 1-inch dice
  • 2 leeks, cut into 1-inch dice
  • 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch dice
  • 4 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 bouquet garni (ingredients below)
  • Bouquet Garni
  • 8 Italian parsley sprigs
  • 2 rosemary spring
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 5 each peppercorns

Short Ribs

  • 6 pieces boneless short ribs, 7 oz each
  • Canola oil, for browning meat
  • Kosher salt
  • All-purpose flour
  • 2 qt grams roasted veal stock
  • 1 qt light chicken stock
  • Butter
  • Freshly cracked pepper
  • Sel gris
  • Chives, for garnish

Directions:

Marinade

  1. Bring the red wine to a simmer in a saucepan over low heat.
  2. Add the mirepoix and bouquet garni. Continue to simmer the marinade until the flame from the alcohol goes out; and continue until you no longer smell hot alcohol aroma.
  3. Turn off the heat and transfer the marinade to a container, and chill completely.

Short Ribs

  1. Trim the excess fat from the meat, and cut each piece against the grain into approximately six 7-ounce portions. If you have small boneless short ribs, there is no need to split them in half.
  2. Place the meat in a container with the chilled marinade and refrigerate for 12 to 16 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 275°F. Remove the meat and the bouquet garni from the marinade.
  4. Transfer the marinade (including the mirepoix) into a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Clarify the liquid by skimming off the impurities that rise to the top. When thoroughly clarified, the marinade will return to the vibrant color of the wine. Remove from heat.
  5. Heat ¼ inch of canola oil in a sauté pan over high heat.
  6. Season both sides of each piece of meat with salt and dredge in flour, patting off the excess.
  7. When the oil is shimmering, add the meat and cook for 2 to 3 minutes on all sides. Because of the red wine, when the meat is properly browned, it will be dark brown with a purple tint. When all sides have browned, transfer to a paper towel-lined rack.
  8. Pour off the excess oil from the pan, leaving the bits stuck to the bottom of the pan for deglazing. (Deglazing is the process of removing and dissolving the bits that stick to the bottom of the pan by adding liquid.)
  9. Return to heat and add the clarified marinade.
  10. Add the short ribs, veal stock, light chicken stock, and bouquet garni. The meat should be covered with liquid; if it’s not, add more veal and chicken stock as necessary.
  11. Bring the liquid to a simmer on the stove. Cover with a lid and transfer to the oven, and braise for about 3 hours, or until the meat is tender.
  12. Transfer the meat to a ceramic baking dish, and carefully pour the cooking liquid over the meat. Make sure meat is submerged in liquid, then cover with plastic wrap and let rest overnight in the refrigerator.
  13. Remove the meat from the baking dish, and transfer the remaining braising liquid to a sauce pot. Bring to a simmer.
  14. Strain the liquid through a chinois, tapping the edge of the chinois with a spoon to help the liquid through. Discard the remnants of the mirepoix.
  15. Place the meat into a saute pan. Add a third of the strained braising liquid, and add enough light chicken stock to slightly reduce the viscosity, starting with a couple of ounces. (The amount you need to use is based on the surface area of your pan. The wider your pan, the more you need to add. The goal is to have enough liquid in the pan to heat the short rib through and glaze it, but without having a ton of liquid left. You don’t want the meat to be sitting in a soup, but you also don’t want the liquid to turn to syrup and have a cold center.)
  16. Bring the liquid to a simmer, basting the meat and allowing the sauce to glaze it. Reduce until it is a sauce consistency.
  17. Finish the sauce with butter for a velvety texture.
  18. Enjoy!

Squash Ravioli With Brown Butter And Sage Sauce

eataly squash ravioli with brown butter and sage sauce

Bring the fun of Eataly to your own dining room with this fall-centric recipe that puts squash into delightful bites of homemade ravioli with decadent brown butter and herbal sauce.

“We love Ravioli Di Zucca, because it is the true announcement that fall is here,” says Eataly North America’s executive chef, Fitz Tallon. “Any hearty squash can be used as a substitute, including my personal favorite—red kuri—which is excellent roasted or stewed thanks to its delicate and mellow chestnut-like flavors. Though of course, butternut squash is the easiest to find, and its nutty-sweet taste is ideal for this dish. If you don't want your filling to be overly sweet, you can leave out the amaretti cookies and sprinkle them on top of the finished dish for whoever craves it!” Dig into the full link.

Ingredients:

Fresh Egg Pasta Dough

  • 3 cups (400 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour; or type 00 flour
  • 4 large eggs

Ravioli

  • Basic egg pasta dough
  • 1¼ lb butternut squash (or pumpkin, if desired)
  • 4 oz amaretti cookies, crumbled
  • 1¼ cups Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest, grated
  • Salt, to taste

Sauce

  • ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 8 sage leaves
  • 1 cup Grana Padano, grated
  • Salt, to taste

Directions:

Fresh Egg Pasta Dough

  1. Form a ball: On a marble or wooden work surface, pile the flour into a mound. Make a well in the center of the mound. In a small bowl, beat the eggs with a fork until blended, and then pour them in the well. Continue beating the egg mixture with the fork, gradually drawing in flour from the sides of the well until the egg has been absorbed by the flour. If needed, wet your hands under the faucet and continue to work the dough. Once the dough has formed, clean your hands and the work surface.
  2. Knead and knead; Clean off your work surface, first by scraping with a bench scraper, then by wiping down with a damp cloth or sponge. Lightly flour the work surface again. Knead the dough by pressing the heel of one hand deep into the ball, keeping your fingers high, then press down on the dough while pushing it firmly away from you. The dough will stretch and roll under your hand like a large shell. Turn the dough over, then press into the dough, first the knuckles of one hand, then with the other; do this about 10 times with the knuckles of each hand. Then repeat the stretching and knuckling process, using more flour if needed to prevent sticking, until the dough is smooth and silky, for about 10 to 20 minutes.
  3. Nota bene: the weather, age of your flour, size of your eggs, and numerous other factors can influence the dough's texture. If the dough is dry and crumbly, sprinkle it with a bit of lukewarm water until it becomes pliable. If too wet, add flour at about a tablespoon at a time, until you can handle it well. Roll the dough into a smooth ball.
  4. Rest. Place the dough in a small bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest for at least 30 minutes at room temperature or up to overnight in the fridge. This is an extremely important step, so don't skip it!

Ravioli

  1. Preheat an oven to 400˚F. Cut the squash into large slices, remove the seeds and pulp, and bake until it is soft, about 30 minutes. Remove the squash from the oven and let it cool. Once it is cool, scrape the flesh of the squash off the rind and wrap it in a kitchen towel, place it in a colander and let it drain for 10 minutes.
  2. Combine the amaretti cookies, Parmigiano Reggiano and lemon zest. Add the drained squash and a pinch of salt, and stir until the filling is smooth and fully combined.
  3. Roll out the egg pasta dough to form a thin sheet. On this, arrange small amounts of the filling, about the size of an egg yolk, then fold the sheet over and cut rectangles out of it around the mounds of filling. Be certain to seal the edges of the pasta.
  4. Cook the ravioli in about 6 quarts of well-salted boiling water (think: as salty as the sea) for 2 to 4 minutes, or until the pasta is al dente.

Sauce

  1. Heat the butter in a medium-sized saucepan, lay the sage leaves in the pan, and heat until the butter is sizzling gently. Toast the leaves for about a minute.
  2. Add 1 cup of boiling water to the butter and sage. Stirring, allow it to simmer for about 2 minutes, reducing the liquid by half. Keep the sauce hot over very low heat, and return it to a simmer.
  3. Remove the ravioli from the water, and place them directly into the pan with the melted butter and sage. Adding hot water to loosen the sauce if necessary, toss until a homogeneous sauce is formed.
  4. Cook the pasta for a minute until it is thoroughly coated with sauce, remove the sage leaves, add the grated cheese and serve in warmed bowls.
  5. Buon appetito!

Cabbage Cake Stuffed With Beef, Nuts and Raisins

Cabbage Cake stuffed with beef, nuts and raisins

Cabbage is one of fall’s less celebrated seasonal vegetables, but this Israeli-inspired recipe from chef Einat Admony, owner and head chef of modern Israeli restaurant Balaboosta in New York City, brings spices and flavors together that’ll make cabbage your new favorite base.

“Every culture has some sort of stuffed cabbage,” chef Admony says. “When I wrote my cookbook, Shuk, I wanted to do something that is fun, unique and delicious.” Catch a glimpse of that book via the full link.

Ingredients:

  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium green cabbage
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium yellow onions, finely chopped
  • 1 cup (185g) jasmine rice, rinsed and drained
  • 1 pound (455g) ground beef
  • 2 tbsp pine nuts, fried or toasted (see page 000)
  • ¼ cup (25g) sliced blanched almonds, fried or toasted (see page 000)
  • ¼ cup (30g) coarsely chopped shelled pistachios
  • ¼ cup (35g) coarsely chopped raisins
  • 1 tsp Aleppo pepper or hot paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ tsp ground cinnamon
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 cups (720ml) homemade or low-sodium store-bought chicken stock or water Tahini Sauce or Yogurt tahini sauce for serving

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325ºF (165ºC).
  2. Fill a large pot with about 3 quarts (3L) water, add 2 teaspoons salt, and bring the water to a boil.
  3. With a sharp knife, carefully carve out the core of the cabbage (this will allow the leaves to loosen and cook more evenly). Using tongs or a slotted spoon, gently plunge the cabbage into the rapidly boiling water, cored-side down, and cook over medium-high heat for 4 to 5 minutes.
  4. Using tongs or two large spoons, remove the cabbage from the pot and place it on the counter, cored-side down. (Keep the water in the pot at a simmer.) Using tongs or two forks, peel away as many of the outer leaves as have softened and become pliable enough to remove. Pile the leaves flat in a colander and rinse with cold water.
  5. Bring the water back to a boil, return the cabbage head to the pot, and boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the cabbage from the water and separate more softened leaves. Repeat this process until you have 14 nice leaves. Check the leaves: If there’s still some core attached or their bottoms are a little tough, trim the leaves or shave any thick ribs as needed so the leaves bend easily. Set aside.
  6. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until soft and golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the rice and sauté for 2 minutes longer. Add the beef, mix well, and sauté, crumbling the meat with a fork, for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and add the pine nuts, almonds, pistachios, raisins, Aleppo pepper, cumin, cinnamon, 1 tablespoon salt, and several twists of black pepper. Mix everything thoroughly with your hands or a spoon; set aside.
  7. To assemble the cake: Slick the bottom and sides of an ovenproof 8- to 9-inch (20 to 23cm) pot (such as a small Dutch oven) with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Line the bottom with one nice cabbage leaf, then arrange 8 more leaves in an overlapping fashion over the bottom and up the sides of the pot. If you are using a shallow (4-inch-high/10cm) pot, the leaves may hang over the rim; that’s fine. Pile the beef mixture in the center of the cabbage leaves and smooth it lightly into an even layer. Fold the ends of the cabbage leaves over the beef mixture, then layer the remaining 6 leaves on top to make a tidy cake. Slowly pour in the stock or water, taking care not to disturb the leaves.
  8. Find a smaller pot lid or a plate that will fit inside the pot (anything flat and heatproof will do) and place it on top of the cabbage cake. (This will weigh down the cake as it cooks and keep it flat.) Cover the pot with a lid or aluminum foil, transfer it to the oven, and bake for 1 hour, until the rice is tender. To check for doneness, open the leaves a little and check the rice: when the rice is tender, everything is cooked.
  9. Take the pot out of the oven, remove the lid and the plate, and heat the cabbage cake on the stovetop over medium heat for about 10 minutes; this will get a little color on the bottom of the cake (which will eventually be the top) and evaporate any excess liquid around the sides. Remove from the heat and leave the cake in the pot to settle the layers for about 10 minutes.
  10. Now get ready for the flip: Place a large flat serving plate (or a cake stand) on top of the pot and, holding the pot and the plate tightly together, flip them with one smooth, decisive swing. Lift the pot away carefully. Cut the cabbage cake into wedges and serve with tahini or yogurt tahini sauce.

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Cake

pumpkin spice coffee cake

Well, we have to include at least one pumpkin spice recipe! This coffee cake is perfect for cozy mornings and desserts.

“It’s super easy to make and can be enjoyed warm or at room temperature,” says chef Nancy Vaccariello, executive pastry chef of Innocent Yesterday in NYC. “Anyone can enjoy making this with your basic cupboard ingredients. It can also be made Gluten-free with a simple swap of All-Purpose Flour for Gluten-free flour. It also pairs perfectly with a hot cup of coffee or tea on a crisp fall morning.” Learn more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Dry Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1½ tsp pumpkin spice
  • Wet Ingredients
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • ½ cup neutral oil (avocado, vegetable or canola)
  • 1 cup soy milk
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

Streusel Topping

  • ½ cup vegan butter (melted)
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 1½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin spice
  • Glaze (optional)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy milk
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Dry ingredients: In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, pumpkin pie spice and sugar until well combined.
  3. Wet ingredients: In a medium bowl, whisk together the pumpkin puree, oil, milk and vanilla until well combined.
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry bowl and stir with a large spoon until just combined. Be careful not to over mix, or the cake will be dense.
  5. Pour the cake batter into the prepared pan. Set aside while you make the streusel.
  6. Streusel: In a medium bowl, mix together the melted vegan butter, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice with a fork until well combined.
  7. Use your hands if needed; it will be crumbly.
  8. Sprinkle the streusel topping all over the cake batter, place in the oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean in the middle.
  9. If using optional glaze: Stir all ingredients together in a small bowl, and drizzle glaze over cooled coffee cake.
  10. Serve with a cup of coffee and enjoy.

Apple Cider Donuts

APPLE CIDER DONUTS

This recipe comes from a fleet of fall recipes provided by celebrity chef and caterer Andrea Correale. Her company, Elegant Affairs, is fantastic at light bites, like these apple cider donuts to be paired with the seasonal drink.

See more of her autumnal offerings via the full link.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • 1½ tsp baking soda
  • 1½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp butter melted
  • ⅔ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp applesauce
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ cup apple cider
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • Pre-mixed cinnamon sugar

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. In another bowl whisk together the egg, melted butter and brown sugar.
  2. Then add the buttermilk, applesauce, vanilla and apple cider. Add the wet ingredients to the bowl of dry ingredients and whisk together just until combined.
  3. Pour the batter into lightly sprayed mini muffin tins. Fill each muffin ¾ full.
  4. Bake for 8 minutes at 350 degrees.
  5. While the donut holes are baking, melt the butter in a microwave-safe bowl. In another bowl combine the sugar and cinnamon together.
  6. When the donut holes come out of the oven dip the top of each donut hole into the melted butter, then dip into the cinnamon sugar mixture. Serve with hot mulled apple cider.

Apple Crumb Pie

apple crumb pie

Chef Andrea Anthony of Food Network’s Eat, Bake and Drink with Andrea knows a thing or two about great fall desserts, and this recipe for her apple crumb pie is one of the best in the biz.

“This Apple Crisp is a great dessert to share with friends and family for Labor Day and is also a great kick-start into the holiday season,” Anthony says. “Make sure to serve warm with a generous scoop of your preferred ice cream. Pro tip: if topping starts to burn in the oven, place a loose sheet of tin foil to prevent it from burning.” Learn more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Crumb topping

  • 1⅓ cups of all-purpose flour
  • ⅔ cup of dark brown sugar
  • 2 tsp of cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • 1 stick of unsalted butter softened

Filling

  • 10 cups of peeled Granny Smith apples thinly sliced (Approx. 3 ¾ lbs.)
  • ½ cup of turbinado sugar
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • Caramel Drizzle
  • 1 cup of dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons of salted butter softened
  • ¼ cup of whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

To Serve

  • Quart vanilla ice cream (optional)

Directions:

Crumb topping

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt until well blended.
  4. Add softened butter to dry mixture with fingertips and toss together until the mixture resembles small pebbles.

Apple Crumble Filling

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine apples, sugar, flour and cinnamon.
  2. Mix until apples are evenly coated.
  3. Pour apples into greased baking pan and spread evenly.
  4. Top with crumbs and bake for 1 hour until apples are soft, filling bubbles, and crumbs are golden brown.
  5. Cool to room temperature.
  6. Caramel Drizzle
  7. Combine the brown sugar and flour together in a saucepan and mix well. Whisk in the butter and milk and bring to a gentle boil.
  8. Cook until thickened, about 1 to 2 minutes, stirring constantly.
  9. Stir in vanilla extract.
  10. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature.
  11. To Serve
  12. Drizzle the warm caramel over the apple crisp.
  13. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

Looking for more delightful recipes? Check out this roundup of recipes from AAPI chefs across the country, or keep things seasonal with a cocktail from our list of go-to fall cocktail recipes.













8 Fall Recipes From Leading Chefs Across The Country

September 22, 2023 by By: Kat Bein

Is autumn the best season for food?

Besides the mania that surrounds all things pumpkin spice, fall also gives us soup season, hearty meat dishes, all manner of squash and root vegetables and delicious desserts.

Basically, the cooler months are the ultimate excuse for heaps of comfort food, and we want to help you get cozy with a few of our favorite fall recipes from the nation’s leading chefs and beloved restaurants.

See also: 4 Festive Fall Recipes from Celebrity Caterer Andrea Correale

From soups and sides to main courses, delectable drinks and desserts worth saving room for, these fall recipes below are sure to make the whole family go for seconds, or make your next friendly gathering a hit to remember!

Butternut Squash and Apple Bisque

butternut squash and apple bisque

Christian Ojeda is the executive chef at Bernardus Lodge & Spa in California, and his guests can’t get enough of this warm bowl of goodness.

“This is an ideal dish for any seasonal event,” Ojeda says. “The butternut squash is a perfect foil for the Gala apples, which add a nice bite. It can be a meal in itself served with a nice crusty bread or starter for any holiday occasion.” Learn more at the full link.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp blended olive oil
  • 1½ cups leeks, chopped (white parts only)
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 3 cups butternut squash, cut into cubes
  • 2 each Gala apples; peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1 quart vegetable stock
  • ¼ cup white wine
  • ¼ cup apple cider
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • Chopped chives
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. In a large pot over medium heat. Add olive oil, leeks and onions, and cook until the onion softens and turns translucent, about 4 to 5 minutes.
  2. Deglaze with white wine, then add squash, apple, apple cider and vegetable stock.
  3. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, then simmer until the vegetables are soft, about 20 minutes.
  4. Carefully puree the soup in batches in a blender.
  5. Once the soup has been pureed, return it to the pot and stir in the cream. Season with nutmeg, salt, and pepper, then simmer gently for 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish with chopped chives, and enjoy!

Roasted Sweet Potato

roasted sweet potato

Sweet potato is one of fall’s absolute calling cards, and New York City’s Mediterranean restaurant Zou’s Zou’s makes the most of this root vegetable with miso goat butter, dukkha and date molasses.

“I like to think of the ember-roasted sweet potato as the sleeper hit of our menu,” says executive chef Madeline Sperling. "A sweet potato is humble on its own, but when charred in our hearth embers and dressed up with umami miso goat butter, sweet date molasses and a crunchy hazelnut dukkah, it becomes a showstopper of a vegetable dish.” Read more about this recipe at the full link.

Ingredients:

  • Sweet Potato
  • Miso Goat Butter

Dukkha

  • 45 grams of toasted hazelnuts chopped, dust shaken through perforated pan
  • 6 grams of toasted coriander, cracked with mortar and pestle
  • 7 grams of toasted white sesame seeds
  • 7 grams of toasted black sesame seeds
  • 7 grams of toasted cumin seeds
  • 4 grams of toasted fennel seeds
  • 1 gram of salt
  • Extra virgin olive oil

Date Molasses

  • 250 grams of date molasses
  • 30 grams of lime juice
  • 3 grams of salt

Directions:

Make the Dukkha

  1. Mix the spices and the hazelnuts together.
  2. Add salt and a drop of evoo to help the seasoning stick to the mixture.
  3. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.

Make the Date Molasses

  1. Whisk all the ingredients together.
  2. Store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Roast the sweet potato

  1. Prepare grill to 375 degrees F, then grill the potatoes on indirect heat for up to an hour, flipping once half-way.
  2. Before removing the potatoes from the grill, set them over direct heat to give the skin some char.
  3. Peel back the chard skin of the sweet potato and gently mash up the inside of the potato, then create a spoon-sized divot in the middle.
  4. In that divot, place a dollop of miso goat butter and generously garnish the potato with the dukkha.
  5. Drizzle the date molasses over top, and enjoy!

Red Wine Braised Short Rib

red wine braised short rib

Looking to impress with a main course that will stick to your ribs and burst with flavor? This recipe from chef Christian Alejandro of Oaken Bistro and Bar near Chicago is the stuff of cozy-night fantasy.

“This recipe was inspired by one from Auguste Escoffier, a 19th-century chef, restaurateur and culinary writer from France most famous for popularizing updated traditional French cooking methods,” chef Alejandro says. “The fundamental techniques employed in this recipe incorporate his teachings and culinary style to offer the diner a mouthwatering, indulgent experience with each and every bite.” Read more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Marinade

  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 2 carrot grams carrots, cut into a 1-inch dice
  • 2 leeks, cut into 1-inch dice
  • 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch dice
  • 4 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 bouquet garni (ingredients below)
  • Bouquet Garni
  • 8 Italian parsley sprigs
  • 2 rosemary spring
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 5 each peppercorns

Short Ribs

  • 6 pieces boneless short ribs, 7 oz each
  • Canola oil, for browning meat
  • Kosher salt
  • All-purpose flour
  • 2 qt grams roasted veal stock
  • 1 qt light chicken stock
  • Butter
  • Freshly cracked pepper
  • Sel gris
  • Chives, for garnish

Directions:

Marinade

  1. Bring the red wine to a simmer in a saucepan over low heat.
  2. Add the mirepoix and bouquet garni. Continue to simmer the marinade until the flame from the alcohol goes out; and continue until you no longer smell hot alcohol aroma.
  3. Turn off the heat and transfer the marinade to a container, and chill completely.

Short Ribs

  1. Trim the excess fat from the meat, and cut each piece against the grain into approximately six 7-ounce portions. If you have small boneless short ribs, there is no need to split them in half.
  2. Place the meat in a container with the chilled marinade and refrigerate for 12 to 16 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 275°F. Remove the meat and the bouquet garni from the marinade.
  4. Transfer the marinade (including the mirepoix) into a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Clarify the liquid by skimming off the impurities that rise to the top. When thoroughly clarified, the marinade will return to the vibrant color of the wine. Remove from heat.
  5. Heat ¼ inch of canola oil in a sauté pan over high heat.
  6. Season both sides of each piece of meat with salt and dredge in flour, patting off the excess.
  7. When the oil is shimmering, add the meat and cook for 2 to 3 minutes on all sides. Because of the red wine, when the meat is properly browned, it will be dark brown with a purple tint. When all sides have browned, transfer to a paper towel-lined rack.
  8. Pour off the excess oil from the pan, leaving the bits stuck to the bottom of the pan for deglazing. (Deglazing is the process of removing and dissolving the bits that stick to the bottom of the pan by adding liquid.)
  9. Return to heat and add the clarified marinade.
  10. Add the short ribs, veal stock, light chicken stock, and bouquet garni. The meat should be covered with liquid; if it’s not, add more veal and chicken stock as necessary.
  11. Bring the liquid to a simmer on the stove. Cover with a lid and transfer to the oven, and braise for about 3 hours, or until the meat is tender.
  12. Transfer the meat to a ceramic baking dish, and carefully pour the cooking liquid over the meat. Make sure meat is submerged in liquid, then cover with plastic wrap and let rest overnight in the refrigerator.
  13. Remove the meat from the baking dish, and transfer the remaining braising liquid to a sauce pot. Bring to a simmer.
  14. Strain the liquid through a chinois, tapping the edge of the chinois with a spoon to help the liquid through. Discard the remnants of the mirepoix.
  15. Place the meat into a saute pan. Add a third of the strained braising liquid, and add enough light chicken stock to slightly reduce the viscosity, starting with a couple of ounces. (The amount you need to use is based on the surface area of your pan. The wider your pan, the more you need to add. The goal is to have enough liquid in the pan to heat the short rib through and glaze it, but without having a ton of liquid left. You don’t want the meat to be sitting in a soup, but you also don’t want the liquid to turn to syrup and have a cold center.)
  16. Bring the liquid to a simmer, basting the meat and allowing the sauce to glaze it. Reduce until it is a sauce consistency.
  17. Finish the sauce with butter for a velvety texture.
  18. Enjoy!

Squash Ravioli With Brown Butter And Sage Sauce

eataly squash ravioli with brown butter and sage sauce

Bring the fun of Eataly to your own dining room with this fall-centric recipe that puts squash into delightful bites of homemade ravioli with decadent brown butter and herbal sauce.

“We love Ravioli Di Zucca, because it is the true announcement that fall is here,” says Eataly North America’s executive chef, Fitz Tallon. “Any hearty squash can be used as a substitute, including my personal favorite—red kuri—which is excellent roasted or stewed thanks to its delicate and mellow chestnut-like flavors. Though of course, butternut squash is the easiest to find, and its nutty-sweet taste is ideal for this dish. If you don't want your filling to be overly sweet, you can leave out the amaretti cookies and sprinkle them on top of the finished dish for whoever craves it!” Dig into the full link.

Ingredients:

Fresh Egg Pasta Dough

  • 3 cups (400 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour; or type 00 flour
  • 4 large eggs

Ravioli

  • Basic egg pasta dough
  • 1¼ lb butternut squash (or pumpkin, if desired)
  • 4 oz amaretti cookies, crumbled
  • 1¼ cups Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest, grated
  • Salt, to taste

Sauce

  • ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 8 sage leaves
  • 1 cup Grana Padano, grated
  • Salt, to taste

Directions:

Fresh Egg Pasta Dough

  1. Form a ball: On a marble or wooden work surface, pile the flour into a mound. Make a well in the center of the mound. In a small bowl, beat the eggs with a fork until blended, and then pour them in the well. Continue beating the egg mixture with the fork, gradually drawing in flour from the sides of the well until the egg has been absorbed by the flour. If needed, wet your hands under the faucet and continue to work the dough. Once the dough has formed, clean your hands and the work surface.
  2. Knead and knead; Clean off your work surface, first by scraping with a bench scraper, then by wiping down with a damp cloth or sponge. Lightly flour the work surface again. Knead the dough by pressing the heel of one hand deep into the ball, keeping your fingers high, then press down on the dough while pushing it firmly away from you. The dough will stretch and roll under your hand like a large shell. Turn the dough over, then press into the dough, first the knuckles of one hand, then with the other; do this about 10 times with the knuckles of each hand. Then repeat the stretching and knuckling process, using more flour if needed to prevent sticking, until the dough is smooth and silky, for about 10 to 20 minutes.
  3. Nota bene: the weather, age of your flour, size of your eggs, and numerous other factors can influence the dough's texture. If the dough is dry and crumbly, sprinkle it with a bit of lukewarm water until it becomes pliable. If too wet, add flour at about a tablespoon at a time, until you can handle it well. Roll the dough into a smooth ball.
  4. Rest. Place the dough in a small bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest for at least 30 minutes at room temperature or up to overnight in the fridge. This is an extremely important step, so don't skip it!

Ravioli

  1. Preheat an oven to 400˚F. Cut the squash into large slices, remove the seeds and pulp, and bake until it is soft, about 30 minutes. Remove the squash from the oven and let it cool. Once it is cool, scrape the flesh of the squash off the rind and wrap it in a kitchen towel, place it in a colander and let it drain for 10 minutes.
  2. Combine the amaretti cookies, Parmigiano Reggiano and lemon zest. Add the drained squash and a pinch of salt, and stir until the filling is smooth and fully combined.
  3. Roll out the egg pasta dough to form a thin sheet. On this, arrange small amounts of the filling, about the size of an egg yolk, then fold the sheet over and cut rectangles out of it around the mounds of filling. Be certain to seal the edges of the pasta.
  4. Cook the ravioli in about 6 quarts of well-salted boiling water (think: as salty as the sea) for 2 to 4 minutes, or until the pasta is al dente.

Sauce

  1. Heat the butter in a medium-sized saucepan, lay the sage leaves in the pan, and heat until the butter is sizzling gently. Toast the leaves for about a minute.
  2. Add 1 cup of boiling water to the butter and sage. Stirring, allow it to simmer for about 2 minutes, reducing the liquid by half. Keep the sauce hot over very low heat, and return it to a simmer.
  3. Remove the ravioli from the water, and place them directly into the pan with the melted butter and sage. Adding hot water to loosen the sauce if necessary, toss until a homogeneous sauce is formed.
  4. Cook the pasta for a minute until it is thoroughly coated with sauce, remove the sage leaves, add the grated cheese and serve in warmed bowls.
  5. Buon appetito!

Cabbage Cake Stuffed With Beef, Nuts and Raisins

Cabbage Cake stuffed with beef, nuts and raisins

Cabbage is one of fall’s less celebrated seasonal vegetables, but this Israeli-inspired recipe from chef Einat Admony, owner and head chef of modern Israeli restaurant Balaboosta in New York City, brings spices and flavors together that’ll make cabbage your new favorite base.

“Every culture has some sort of stuffed cabbage,” chef Admony says. “When I wrote my cookbook, Shuk, I wanted to do something that is fun, unique and delicious.” Catch a glimpse of that book via the full link.

Ingredients:

  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium green cabbage
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium yellow onions, finely chopped
  • 1 cup (185g) jasmine rice, rinsed and drained
  • 1 pound (455g) ground beef
  • 2 tbsp pine nuts, fried or toasted (see page 000)
  • ¼ cup (25g) sliced blanched almonds, fried or toasted (see page 000)
  • ¼ cup (30g) coarsely chopped shelled pistachios
  • ¼ cup (35g) coarsely chopped raisins
  • 1 tsp Aleppo pepper or hot paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ tsp ground cinnamon
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 cups (720ml) homemade or low-sodium store-bought chicken stock or water Tahini Sauce or Yogurt tahini sauce for serving

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325ºF (165ºC).
  2. Fill a large pot with about 3 quarts (3L) water, add 2 teaspoons salt, and bring the water to a boil.
  3. With a sharp knife, carefully carve out the core of the cabbage (this will allow the leaves to loosen and cook more evenly). Using tongs or a slotted spoon, gently plunge the cabbage into the rapidly boiling water, cored-side down, and cook over medium-high heat for 4 to 5 minutes.
  4. Using tongs or two large spoons, remove the cabbage from the pot and place it on the counter, cored-side down. (Keep the water in the pot at a simmer.) Using tongs or two forks, peel away as many of the outer leaves as have softened and become pliable enough to remove. Pile the leaves flat in a colander and rinse with cold water.
  5. Bring the water back to a boil, return the cabbage head to the pot, and boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the cabbage from the water and separate more softened leaves. Repeat this process until you have 14 nice leaves. Check the leaves: If there’s still some core attached or their bottoms are a little tough, trim the leaves or shave any thick ribs as needed so the leaves bend easily. Set aside.
  6. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until soft and golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the rice and sauté for 2 minutes longer. Add the beef, mix well, and sauté, crumbling the meat with a fork, for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and add the pine nuts, almonds, pistachios, raisins, Aleppo pepper, cumin, cinnamon, 1 tablespoon salt, and several twists of black pepper. Mix everything thoroughly with your hands or a spoon; set aside.
  7. To assemble the cake: Slick the bottom and sides of an ovenproof 8- to 9-inch (20 to 23cm) pot (such as a small Dutch oven) with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Line the bottom with one nice cabbage leaf, then arrange 8 more leaves in an overlapping fashion over the bottom and up the sides of the pot. If you are using a shallow (4-inch-high/10cm) pot, the leaves may hang over the rim; that’s fine. Pile the beef mixture in the center of the cabbage leaves and smooth it lightly into an even layer. Fold the ends of the cabbage leaves over the beef mixture, then layer the remaining 6 leaves on top to make a tidy cake. Slowly pour in the stock or water, taking care not to disturb the leaves.
  8. Find a smaller pot lid or a plate that will fit inside the pot (anything flat and heatproof will do) and place it on top of the cabbage cake. (This will weigh down the cake as it cooks and keep it flat.) Cover the pot with a lid or aluminum foil, transfer it to the oven, and bake for 1 hour, until the rice is tender. To check for doneness, open the leaves a little and check the rice: when the rice is tender, everything is cooked.
  9. Take the pot out of the oven, remove the lid and the plate, and heat the cabbage cake on the stovetop over medium heat for about 10 minutes; this will get a little color on the bottom of the cake (which will eventually be the top) and evaporate any excess liquid around the sides. Remove from the heat and leave the cake in the pot to settle the layers for about 10 minutes.
  10. Now get ready for the flip: Place a large flat serving plate (or a cake stand) on top of the pot and, holding the pot and the plate tightly together, flip them with one smooth, decisive swing. Lift the pot away carefully. Cut the cabbage cake into wedges and serve with tahini or yogurt tahini sauce.

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Cake

pumpkin spice coffee cake

Well, we have to include at least one pumpkin spice recipe! This coffee cake is perfect for cozy mornings and desserts.

“It’s super easy to make and can be enjoyed warm or at room temperature,” says chef Nancy Vaccariello, executive pastry chef of Innocent Yesterday in NYC. “Anyone can enjoy making this with your basic cupboard ingredients. It can also be made Gluten-free with a simple swap of All-Purpose Flour for Gluten-free flour. It also pairs perfectly with a hot cup of coffee or tea on a crisp fall morning.” Learn more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Dry Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1½ tsp pumpkin spice
  • Wet Ingredients
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • ½ cup neutral oil (avocado, vegetable or canola)
  • 1 cup soy milk
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

Streusel Topping

  • ½ cup vegan butter (melted)
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 1½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin spice
  • Glaze (optional)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy milk
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Dry ingredients: In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, pumpkin pie spice and sugar until well combined.
  3. Wet ingredients: In a medium bowl, whisk together the pumpkin puree, oil, milk and vanilla until well combined.
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry bowl and stir with a large spoon until just combined. Be careful not to over mix, or the cake will be dense.
  5. Pour the cake batter into the prepared pan. Set aside while you make the streusel.
  6. Streusel: In a medium bowl, mix together the melted vegan butter, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice with a fork until well combined.
  7. Use your hands if needed; it will be crumbly.
  8. Sprinkle the streusel topping all over the cake batter, place in the oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean in the middle.
  9. If using optional glaze: Stir all ingredients together in a small bowl, and drizzle glaze over cooled coffee cake.
  10. Serve with a cup of coffee and enjoy.

Apple Cider Donuts

APPLE CIDER DONUTS

This recipe comes from a fleet of fall recipes provided by celebrity chef and caterer Andrea Correale. Her company, Elegant Affairs, is fantastic at light bites, like these apple cider donuts to be paired with the seasonal drink.

See more of her autumnal offerings via the full link.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • 1½ tsp baking soda
  • 1½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp butter melted
  • ⅔ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp applesauce
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ cup apple cider
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • Pre-mixed cinnamon sugar

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. In another bowl whisk together the egg, melted butter and brown sugar.
  2. Then add the buttermilk, applesauce, vanilla and apple cider. Add the wet ingredients to the bowl of dry ingredients and whisk together just until combined.
  3. Pour the batter into lightly sprayed mini muffin tins. Fill each muffin ¾ full.
  4. Bake for 8 minutes at 350 degrees.
  5. While the donut holes are baking, melt the butter in a microwave-safe bowl. In another bowl combine the sugar and cinnamon together.
  6. When the donut holes come out of the oven dip the top of each donut hole into the melted butter, then dip into the cinnamon sugar mixture. Serve with hot mulled apple cider.

Apple Crumb Pie

apple crumb pie

Chef Andrea Anthony of Food Network’s Eat, Bake and Drink with Andrea knows a thing or two about great fall desserts, and this recipe for her apple crumb pie is one of the best in the biz.

“This Apple Crisp is a great dessert to share with friends and family for Labor Day and is also a great kick-start into the holiday season,” Anthony says. “Make sure to serve warm with a generous scoop of your preferred ice cream. Pro tip: if topping starts to burn in the oven, place a loose sheet of tin foil to prevent it from burning.” Learn more via the full link.

Ingredients:

Crumb topping

  • 1⅓ cups of all-purpose flour
  • ⅔ cup of dark brown sugar
  • 2 tsp of cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • 1 stick of unsalted butter softened

Filling

  • 10 cups of peeled Granny Smith apples thinly sliced (Approx. 3 ¾ lbs.)
  • ½ cup of turbinado sugar
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • Caramel Drizzle
  • 1 cup of dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons of salted butter softened
  • ¼ cup of whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

To Serve

  • Quart vanilla ice cream (optional)

Directions:

Crumb topping

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt until well blended.
  4. Add softened butter to dry mixture with fingertips and toss together until the mixture resembles small pebbles.

Apple Crumble Filling

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine apples, sugar, flour and cinnamon.
  2. Mix until apples are evenly coated.
  3. Pour apples into greased baking pan and spread evenly.
  4. Top with crumbs and bake for 1 hour until apples are soft, filling bubbles, and crumbs are golden brown.
  5. Cool to room temperature.
  6. Caramel Drizzle
  7. Combine the brown sugar and flour together in a saucepan and mix well. Whisk in the butter and milk and bring to a gentle boil.
  8. Cook until thickened, about 1 to 2 minutes, stirring constantly.
  9. Stir in vanilla extract.
  10. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature.
  11. To Serve
  12. Drizzle the warm caramel over the apple crisp.
  13. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

Looking for more delightful recipes? Check out this roundup of recipes from AAPI chefs across the country, or keep things seasonal with a cocktail from our list of go-to fall cocktail recipes.