Cantonese Chicken Curry Recipe: How To Make

Weekly Recipe: Chicken With Cantonese Curry Sauce By Susan Jung

January 31, 2024 by

Kat Bein Kat Bein

CHICKEN-CANTONESE-CURRy-Yuki-Sugiura-cover.jpg

Curry is one of the most delightful and diverse sauces one can encounter around the world, and while India may produce the most famous (at least here in the United States), journalist and Chinese cuisine expert Susan Jung wants to embrace Hong Kong’s take.

“Hong Kong-style curry has its roots in Indian cuisine, but the flavour has been changed,” Jung says. “It’s a little sweeter and less spicy. For the true Hong Kong flavour, use a made-in-Hong Kong chilli powder. I recommend Koon Yick Wah Kee, but if you have your own favourite brand, use that instead.”

See also: Weekly Recipe: Sloppy Khan By Khan Saab in California

Jung is the author of Kung Pao and Beyond, a cookbook recently published via Hardie Grant Publishing that explores fried chicken recipes from East and Southeast Asia.

In the book, which is currently available on Amazon and other fine retailers, she offers a beautiful recipe for chicken cutlets with Cantonese curry sauce—and she’s also sharing that recipe with our readers below.

kung pao and beyond cookbook cover by susan jung

“There’s a restaurant in Hong Kong that I just love—Sun King Yuen,” Jung writes in Kung Pao and Beyond. “It has an extensive menu, but I’ve never even glanced at it because I order only one thing: the Curry Pork Chop Rice. It’s a huge portion of wonderfully tender, lightly breaded fried pork chop served over rice, with a side bowl of curry sauce with a single potato in it. I decided to make a version of it, but using chicken in place of the pork, and panko instead of Sun King Yuen’s softer coating. I also wanted to add more potatoes to the sauce because one is just not enough. This makes more curry sauce than you’ll need for the chicken. Store the leftovers in the fridge and use within about 10 days.”

This recipe yields four to six servings and is sure to be an instant hit with your family and friends. Let the delivery driver have a night off and make up own curry magic with the Jung’s recipe below.

Chicken Cutlets with Cantonese Curry Sauce

CHICKEN cutlets with CANTONESE CURRy sauce

Ingredients:

  • 8 boneless chicken thighs, about 120g (4 ¼ oz) each
  • Coarse salt flakes, as necessary
  • 1 tsp finely ground white pepper
  • 40ml (2 tbsp + 2 tsp) rice wine
  • about 120g (4 ¼ oz) potato or sweet potato flour
  • 3 to 4 eggs
  • about 160g (5 ¾ oz) panko breadcrumbs
  • 600ml (generous 2 ½ cups) cooking oil
  • cooked rice, as needed

Curry Sauce

  • 800g (1lb 12oz) all-purpose potatoes
  • 200g (7oz) peeled onion
  • 30g (1oz) peeled garlic cloves
  • 20g (3/4 oz) thinly sliced peeled ginger
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) cooking oil
  • 10g (1/3oz) curry powder (see note)
  • ½ –1 tsp Tianjin chilli powder, or to taste
  • 40g (1/2 oz) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 200ml (scant 1 cup) evaporated milk
  • 20g (4 tsp) granulated sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) fish sauce
  • 20ml (4 tsp) soy sauce (all-purpose Kikkoman or your favorite brand)
  • 60g (2oz) golden syrup (or corn syrup)

Note

Choose your curry powder carefully because it can vary a lot in taste and spice level, depending on the producer. If possible, look for a brand that’s made in Hong Kong, such as Koon Yick Wah Kee.

Directions:

  1. Butterfly the chicken thighs (see page 20) and put them in a bowl. Weigh the chicken, then multiply the amount by 0.015 – this is the amount of salt you need. Sprinkle the salt and pepper over the chicken, then drizzle with the rice wine and rub it into the meat. Set aside at room temperature while you prepare the sauce.
  2. Peel the potatoes then cut them into 4cm (1.in) chunks. Put the potatoes in a pan of salted water and place over a medium heat. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, simmer for 3 minutes, then drain in a colander.
  3. Mince the onion, garlic and ginger. Heat the cooking oil for the curry sauce in a pan set over a low heat, then add the onion, garlic and ginger. Stir frequently until the onion starts to soften, then add the curry and chilli powders. Stir for 30 seconds, then sprinkle in the plain flour. Stir constantly for 2 minutes – it will be quite dry. Add 1 litre (41/3 cups) of water a little at a time, using a whisk to stir well. After adding all the water, whisk in the evaporated milk, sugar, fish sauce, soy sauce and syrup. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the potatoes and simmer for 5–10 minutes, or until they are soft, and the sauce is a good consistency. Taste for seasonings and adjust if necessary, then turn off the heat.
  4. Put the potato or sweet potato flour in a shallow dish. Whisk the eggs in another shallow dish and put the panko in a third dish. Dredge the chicken thighs in the flour, shake off the excess, then dip in the egg. Dredge in the panko, pressing firmly so the breadcrumbs adhere.
  5. Pour the cooking oil for the chicken into a 28cm (11.in) frying pan (skillet), preferably cast iron, set over a medium heat. Fry the chicken at 160° C (320° F) for 6–8 minutes, turning over the pieces as necessary. Drain the chicken on a cooling rack placed over a tray.
  6. Reheat the sauce and thin it by whisking in some water, if necessary. Cut the chicken into strips about 1cm (1/2 in) wide; serve with the cooked rice, and curry sauce on the side.

This recipe is an excerpt as featured in Kung Pao and Beyond, available on Amazon. Follow Susan Jung on Instagram for more delicious dishes and inspiration.













Weekly Recipe: Chicken With Cantonese Curry Sauce By Susan Jung

January 31, 2024 by Kat Bein

CHICKEN-CANTONESE-CURRy-Yuki-Sugiura-cover.jpg

Curry is one of the most delightful and diverse sauces one can encounter around the world, and while India may produce the most famous (at least here in the United States), journalist and Chinese cuisine expert Susan Jung wants to embrace Hong Kong’s take.

“Hong Kong-style curry has its roots in Indian cuisine, but the flavour has been changed,” Jung says. “It’s a little sweeter and less spicy. For the true Hong Kong flavour, use a made-in-Hong Kong chilli powder. I recommend Koon Yick Wah Kee, but if you have your own favourite brand, use that instead.”

See also: Weekly Recipe: Sloppy Khan By Khan Saab in California

Jung is the author of Kung Pao and Beyond, a cookbook recently published via Hardie Grant Publishing that explores fried chicken recipes from East and Southeast Asia.

In the book, which is currently available on Amazon and other fine retailers, she offers a beautiful recipe for chicken cutlets with Cantonese curry sauce—and she’s also sharing that recipe with our readers below.

kung pao and beyond cookbook cover by susan jung

“There’s a restaurant in Hong Kong that I just love—Sun King Yuen,” Jung writes in Kung Pao and Beyond. “It has an extensive menu, but I’ve never even glanced at it because I order only one thing: the Curry Pork Chop Rice. It’s a huge portion of wonderfully tender, lightly breaded fried pork chop served over rice, with a side bowl of curry sauce with a single potato in it. I decided to make a version of it, but using chicken in place of the pork, and panko instead of Sun King Yuen’s softer coating. I also wanted to add more potatoes to the sauce because one is just not enough. This makes more curry sauce than you’ll need for the chicken. Store the leftovers in the fridge and use within about 10 days.”

This recipe yields four to six servings and is sure to be an instant hit with your family and friends. Let the delivery driver have a night off and make up own curry magic with the Jung’s recipe below.

Chicken Cutlets with Cantonese Curry Sauce

CHICKEN cutlets with CANTONESE CURRy sauce

Ingredients:

  • 8 boneless chicken thighs, about 120g (4 ¼ oz) each
  • Coarse salt flakes, as necessary
  • 1 tsp finely ground white pepper
  • 40ml (2 tbsp + 2 tsp) rice wine
  • about 120g (4 ¼ oz) potato or sweet potato flour
  • 3 to 4 eggs
  • about 160g (5 ¾ oz) panko breadcrumbs
  • 600ml (generous 2 ½ cups) cooking oil
  • cooked rice, as needed

Curry Sauce

  • 800g (1lb 12oz) all-purpose potatoes
  • 200g (7oz) peeled onion
  • 30g (1oz) peeled garlic cloves
  • 20g (3/4 oz) thinly sliced peeled ginger
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) cooking oil
  • 10g (1/3oz) curry powder (see note)
  • ½ –1 tsp Tianjin chilli powder, or to taste
  • 40g (1/2 oz) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 200ml (scant 1 cup) evaporated milk
  • 20g (4 tsp) granulated sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) fish sauce
  • 20ml (4 tsp) soy sauce (all-purpose Kikkoman or your favorite brand)
  • 60g (2oz) golden syrup (or corn syrup)

Note

Choose your curry powder carefully because it can vary a lot in taste and spice level, depending on the producer. If possible, look for a brand that’s made in Hong Kong, such as Koon Yick Wah Kee.

Directions:

  1. Butterfly the chicken thighs (see page 20) and put them in a bowl. Weigh the chicken, then multiply the amount by 0.015 – this is the amount of salt you need. Sprinkle the salt and pepper over the chicken, then drizzle with the rice wine and rub it into the meat. Set aside at room temperature while you prepare the sauce.
  2. Peel the potatoes then cut them into 4cm (1.in) chunks. Put the potatoes in a pan of salted water and place over a medium heat. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, simmer for 3 minutes, then drain in a colander.
  3. Mince the onion, garlic and ginger. Heat the cooking oil for the curry sauce in a pan set over a low heat, then add the onion, garlic and ginger. Stir frequently until the onion starts to soften, then add the curry and chilli powders. Stir for 30 seconds, then sprinkle in the plain flour. Stir constantly for 2 minutes – it will be quite dry. Add 1 litre (41/3 cups) of water a little at a time, using a whisk to stir well. After adding all the water, whisk in the evaporated milk, sugar, fish sauce, soy sauce and syrup. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the potatoes and simmer for 5–10 minutes, or until they are soft, and the sauce is a good consistency. Taste for seasonings and adjust if necessary, then turn off the heat.
  4. Put the potato or sweet potato flour in a shallow dish. Whisk the eggs in another shallow dish and put the panko in a third dish. Dredge the chicken thighs in the flour, shake off the excess, then dip in the egg. Dredge in the panko, pressing firmly so the breadcrumbs adhere.
  5. Pour the cooking oil for the chicken into a 28cm (11.in) frying pan (skillet), preferably cast iron, set over a medium heat. Fry the chicken at 160° C (320° F) for 6–8 minutes, turning over the pieces as necessary. Drain the chicken on a cooling rack placed over a tray.
  6. Reheat the sauce and thin it by whisking in some water, if necessary. Cut the chicken into strips about 1cm (1/2 in) wide; serve with the cooked rice, and curry sauce on the side.

This recipe is an excerpt as featured in Kung Pao and Beyond, available on Amazon. Follow Susan Jung on Instagram for more delicious dishes and inspiration.