Swet Tailor Brings a new feel to traditional style

Swet Tailor Brings a new feel to traditional style

September 25, 2019 by Sari Anne Tischman

Adam Bolden and David Kranz came upon Swet Tailor (swettailor.com)—the company of which they now serve as CEO and Chief Merchandising Officer, respectively—through, of all places, Kickstarter. The unlikely campaign was for a pant that looked like jeans but had the comfort of a sweatpant, a concept that resonated with the men, both veterans of the clothing industry, given the changing face of men's fashion. “Jeans are the most common pants men wear, and we [wanted to give] them that style [but] in a new way—French terry knit with spandex,” says Kranz. “Our concept is simple: We take properties of quality, comfort and style and incorporate blended fabrics into pieces that move with a man.”

The partners originally came on as consultants to the company, eventually investing and ultimately taking the reins in late 2014. The following year, they launched the Swet Tailor website and introduced their first product, the All-In-Pant, a five-pocket style that became a best-seller. Kranz and Bolden have taken the Swet Tailor ethos and also applied it to other men's staples, including shorts, joggers, sweatshirts, tees and button-downs, all sold on the brand's website and at more than 50 retailers, including Ron Robinson in L.A. Up next is a stretch suit, comprised of a two-button blazer and a flat-front stretch pant. “It took a while to get it right, but we're ready for our customer to take on the boardroom in a redefined way, all business and no restriction—literally,” says Kranz. Focused on being as inclusive of a company as possible, Swet Tailor launches High & Mighty sizing this fall, a range that will include up to a 36-inch inseam in pants and 6XL in tops. A women's line is on the horizon as well.

“The emergence of athleisure and an overall need for comfort attire began in L.A. and has subsequently shaped how the rest of the country dresses,” says Bolden. “We want to make style effortless.”













Swet Tailor Brings a new feel to traditional style

September 25, 2019 by Sari Anne Tischman

Adam Bolden and David Kranz came upon Swet Tailor (swettailor.com)—the company of which they now serve as CEO and Chief Merchandising Officer, respectively—through, of all places, Kickstarter. The unlikely campaign was for a pant that looked like jeans but had the comfort of a sweatpant, a concept that resonated with the men, both veterans of the clothing industry, given the changing face of men's fashion. “Jeans are the most common pants men wear, and we [wanted to give] them that style [but] in a new way—French terry knit with spandex,” says Kranz. “Our concept is simple: We take properties of quality, comfort and style and incorporate blended fabrics into pieces that move with a man.”

The partners originally came on as consultants to the company, eventually investing and ultimately taking the reins in late 2014. The following year, they launched the Swet Tailor website and introduced their first product, the All-In-Pant, a five-pocket style that became a best-seller. Kranz and Bolden have taken the Swet Tailor ethos and also applied it to other men's staples, including shorts, joggers, sweatshirts, tees and button-downs, all sold on the brand's website and at more than 50 retailers, including Ron Robinson in L.A. Up next is a stretch suit, comprised of a two-button blazer and a flat-front stretch pant. “It took a while to get it right, but we're ready for our customer to take on the boardroom in a redefined way, all business and no restriction—literally,” says Kranz. Focused on being as inclusive of a company as possible, Swet Tailor launches High & Mighty sizing this fall, a range that will include up to a 36-inch inseam in pants and 6XL in tops. A women's line is on the horizon as well.

“The emergence of athleisure and an overall need for comfort attire began in L.A. and has subsequently shaped how the rest of the country dresses,” says Bolden. “We want to make style effortless.”