Meet SBE's New Beverage Director, Ready to Shake Things Up

Meet SBE's New Beverage Director, Ready to Shake Things Up

September 25, 2019 by Riki Altman-Yee

As the new corporate beverage director for sbe, Gui Jaroschy is ready to shake things up. He's supremely well-versed in mixology and keeps abreast of every spice-rimmed, foam-topped innovation, but in his new role as the corporate beverage director for lifestyle hospitality company sbe, he's venturing into uncharted territories. His new responsibilities include conjuring up distinctive drink menus and new bar concepts for the brand's 30 hotels and 175 restaurant, bar and nightlife venues (many of which are right here in Miami), yet Jaroschy says his primary focus is more comprehensive. “I would like our reputation to be [the brand] where you can develop yourself and pursue your craft,” he explains. e human factor has long been important to Jaroschy, who received a degree in cultural anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin, his hometown, in 2006. It only took one visit to Miami to get him to stay. He landed a bartending job at the Delano but says “someone had to die” before a regular gig became available there, so he left to work at the W South Beach, befriending Elad Zvi and Gabriel Orta, who would later o er him a job at Broken Shaker. As their bar manager, Jaroschy helped take Miami's cocktail culture to the next level. Most recently Jaroschy has been busy reimagining spots for sbe including the S Bar at the SLS LUX Brickell and SAAM at the SLS Brickell, both of which will soon feature hydroponically grown herbs and garnishes as part of the decor. (“I have a major green thumb,” he says.) He's also unveiling new drink menus incorporating aged Japanese whisky for sbe's Katsuya restaurants worldwide and introducing fresh ideas for Diez y Seis at the Shore Club in Miami Beach, where he plans to use piloncillo (unre ned whole cane sugar) in the Sonoran Old-Fashioneds on the drinks menu. Across the board, he says, the Miami market demands a particular formula when it comes to cocktails: “It has to be exciting. You have to create something people can be passionate about and capture their imagination.”













Meet SBE's New Beverage Director, Ready to Shake Things Up

September 25, 2019 by Riki Altman-Yee

As the new corporate beverage director for sbe, Gui Jaroschy is ready to shake things up. He's supremely well-versed in mixology and keeps abreast of every spice-rimmed, foam-topped innovation, but in his new role as the corporate beverage director for lifestyle hospitality company sbe, he's venturing into uncharted territories. His new responsibilities include conjuring up distinctive drink menus and new bar concepts for the brand's 30 hotels and 175 restaurant, bar and nightlife venues (many of which are right here in Miami), yet Jaroschy says his primary focus is more comprehensive. “I would like our reputation to be [the brand] where you can develop yourself and pursue your craft,” he explains. e human factor has long been important to Jaroschy, who received a degree in cultural anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin, his hometown, in 2006. It only took one visit to Miami to get him to stay. He landed a bartending job at the Delano but says “someone had to die” before a regular gig became available there, so he left to work at the W South Beach, befriending Elad Zvi and Gabriel Orta, who would later o er him a job at Broken Shaker. As their bar manager, Jaroschy helped take Miami's cocktail culture to the next level. Most recently Jaroschy has been busy reimagining spots for sbe including the S Bar at the SLS LUX Brickell and SAAM at the SLS Brickell, both of which will soon feature hydroponically grown herbs and garnishes as part of the decor. (“I have a major green thumb,” he says.) He's also unveiling new drink menus incorporating aged Japanese whisky for sbe's Katsuya restaurants worldwide and introducing fresh ideas for Diez y Seis at the Shore Club in Miami Beach, where he plans to use piloncillo (unre ned whole cane sugar) in the Sonoran Old-Fashioneds on the drinks menu. Across the board, he says, the Miami market demands a particular formula when it comes to cocktails: “It has to be exciting. You have to create something people can be passionate about and capture their imagination.”